RVing with Dogs: What you should know

RVing with dogs
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Want to go RVing with dogs but have no idea where to start? Hopefully you’ll get a clearer sense of what to do after reading this article.

RVing with Dogs

If you’re a pet owner, you might be hesitant to take a camping trip. It’s understandable. Who would want to leave their dogs behind? That being said, it might be more difficult, but it’s not impossible to go RVing with dogs. In fact, there are a ton of pet-friendly RV parks and campgrounds you could go to.

Most of them have a dedicated pet area so your dog will have space to run around and play with other dogs. Of course, these places usually also have rules about your pets. For example, some pet-friendly campgrounds only allow your dogs to stay within your campsite. That is to say, they cannot roam around freely in the whole campground. Make sure you’re aware of them and try to follow them to a tee.

Now that we’ve established it’s okay to go RVing with dogs, below are a few tips for bringing your pet on the road.

Familiarize your dog with your RV

Firstly, you might be excited to bring your dog along your RV trip. However, do not rush into it. As a dog owner, you should know that taking your pet on long rides isn’t always great because even the most well-behaved dogs can get fussy.

For this reason, make sure you give them enough time to adapt to your RV. Don’t just drag them into your RV and then go on ahead with your trip. Let them stay in your RV for hours at a time, slowly increasing the time spent inside. In this way, they slowly get acquainted with their new environment. After all, your RV will not only be your motorhome, but theirs as well.

Make sure your dog is compatible with RV life

Additionally, determine if your dog is compatible with the RV life. Some dogs cannot stand to be alone while some get extremely nervous when placed in a new environment. Therefore, you need to consider if your dog is either of the two because no matter how badly you want to take your furry friend with you, we’re sure you don’t want to stress them out.

To illustrate, if you’re RV trip will consist of activities such as hiking or boating, your dog should be willing and capable to those things too. Otherwise, you’ll have to leave them cooped up inside your RV. That simply won’t do, because temperatures inside an RV can reach extremely high levels – levels that can be dangerous to your pet if they’re left alone.

Moreover, your dog also deserves some time outside to roam around, get rid of its energy, and stretch its legs. If it won’t be able to spend time with you outside, the point of bringing it along on your trip is moot.

Pet Safety is of utmost importance

Thirdly, prioritize the safety of everyone. When your vehicle is in motion, ensure that your pets are not roaming around freely. In fact, they should be strapped to a chair with a belt, or in a secured crate. Truthfully, it might be tempting to let them stay on your lap, or walk around your RV freely. However, this arrangement is not only dangerous for them, but also for you. Many things can happen on the road. Sudden stops, accidents, or loud noises from other vehicle’s horns can startle your pets.

In the case of loud noises, your dog could be startled and then they could jump out the second you open doors. This is dangerous because then they can run to who knows where. Moreover, pets that can roam around freely while you’re driving, can be a distraction. You can’t give them attention while you’re driving lest you want your RV to crash.

Have your dog chipped

Another thing you should is to make sure your dog is chipped before bringing them along. As a dog owner, one of your worst nightmares might be losing your pet. Once you’ve parked your vehicle in a campground and let your dog loose, there’s no telling what can happen. For this reason, it’s a good idea to have your dogs chipped before leaving for a trip.

Of course, we’re not saying you’re an irresponsible pet owner. But there have been many incidents through the years of dogs wandering around, never to be found. This can happen even in campground with set dog parks. It’s better to be safe than sorry. Additionally, it would be wise to bring your most recent pet information with you. This includes pictures, medical records, and proof of ownership.

Keep your dog’s vaccine’s up to date

If you plan to bring your dog on your RV trip, make sure his vaccinations are up to date because many campgrounds, although pet-friendly, will ask to see their paperwork and check if they have the most recent shots, especially anti-rabies shots. This is part of keeping everyone at the campground safe.

In addition to keeping your pet’s shots up to date, make sure you know where the nearest vet is. You don’t know what will happen. Your dog could have a run-in with wildlife or they could consume something they’re not supposed to. Hence, it would be nice to know where you can rush them to.

List down essential pet supplies

To ensure you don’t bring everything your pet needs, make sure you have a list on hand. With all the things you need already need to keep track of, having a list would be immense help.

This list could include their leash, food, toys, blanket, bed, hygiene kit, and pick-up bags. Just imagine forgetting to bring your favorite toy when you’re already on the road and your dog is throwing a fit. That’s not something you want, right?

Take frequent breaks

When you’re RVing without pets, you don’t have to worry about when to stop driving. As a matter of fact, you can drive for hours and it won’t be a problem. In contrast, RVing with dogs will require you to stop frequently for your dog’s potty breaks or walks. Allotting time for your dogs to take short walks will keep them from becoming antsy and consequently hard to handle while on the road.   

Summary

So, there you go, some of the most basic things you should know in order to go RVing with dogs. As you can see, there’s no need to leave your best friend at home when you go on the road. You can bring them with you, as long as you take the proper precautions to keep them, and yourself, safe.

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